Destiny
My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and more intelligent than college professors.
Maya Angelou (via aestheticintrovert)
death-by-lulz:

 soviet russian grandma cats complaining about their grandchildren and swapping recipes

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

death-by-lulz:

 soviet russian grandma cats complaining about their grandchildren and swapping recipes

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

toilluminateandinspire:

Amanda Diaz
spiritualaspirant:

Confusion: Whom To Take Advice From?
Imām al-Māwardī mentioned 5 characteristics of those whose advice should be sought:
✔  Sound intellect along with previous experience.
al-Māwardī said, “Because extensive experience allows for sound contemplation.”
✔ That the person be a practising Muslim and pious.
al-Māwardī said, “For this is the pillar of all good and door to all success.”
✔ That the consulted be one giving sincere advice (naṣīḥah) and caring.
al-Māwardī said, “Sincere advice and love enables a person’s thought to be correct and view to be clear.” One of the early Muslims (salaf) said: “The strike of the person who gives you sincere advice is better for you than the greeting of the one who insults you.”
One of bedouins said: “The sincere advice of a friend is training (taʾdīb) and the advice of the enemy is a rebuke (taʾnīb).”
✔ That the person being consulted is free from worries and concerns.
al-Māwardī said, “As the person whose thoughts are preoccupied worries cannot think objectively nor concentrate on a matter.”
✔ That person whose advice is sought does not have a personal interest in the in the matter being discussed.
al-Māwardī said, “Because peoples personal objectives pull them and personal desires will repel. If thoughts are conflicted by personal desires and are pulled by personal objectives they will be ruined.”
(related by al-Kakazai; www.daralhadith.org.uk)

spiritualaspirant:

Confusion: Whom To Take Advice From?

Imām al-Māwardī mentioned 5 characteristics of those whose advice should be sought:

✔  Sound intellect along with previous experience.

al-Māwardī said, “Because extensive experience allows for sound contemplation.”

✔ That the person be a practising Muslim and pious.

al-Māwardī said, “For this is the pillar of all good and door to all success.”

 That the consulted be one giving sincere advice (naṣīḥah) and caring.

al-Māwardī said, “Sincere advice and love enables a person’s thought to be correct and view to be clear. One of the early Muslims (salaf) said: The strike of the person who gives you sincere advice is better for you than the greeting of the one who insults you.

One of bedouins said: The sincere advice of a friend is training (taʾdīb) and the advice of the enemy is a rebuke (taʾnīb).”

 That the person being consulted is free from worries and concerns.

al-Māwardī said, “As the person whose thoughts are preoccupied worries cannot think objectively nor concentrate on a matter.”

 That person whose advice is sought does not have a personal interest in the in the matter being discussed.

al-Māwardī said, “Because peoples personal objectives pull them and personal desires will repel. If thoughts are conflicted by personal desires and are pulled by personal objectives they will be ruined.”

(related by al-Kakazai; www.daralhadith.org.uk)